What is flow cytometry?

The flow system

Light scatter

Fluorescence measurement

Multiparametric measurement

Advantages of flow cytometry

Disadvantages of flow cytometry

Sample preparation

Applications

Data display

Safety

Further reading

Self Assessment

Introductory Contents Further reading Units 	Introduction  The flow cytometer 	Data analysis 	Immunofluorescence 	Some clinical applications  DNA and the cell cycle Other applications Cell proliferation Cell death Assignment 1 Assignment 2

Self Assessment Questions

Unit 1

1. What is the most important feature of flow cytometry?

a. You can measure mammalian cells.

b. It uses laser light.

c. It measures single cells.

d. You can sort cells.

e. The data can be analysed by computer.

2. What is the purpose of the sheath fluid?

a. To scatter laser light.

b. To focus hydrodynamically the sample stream.

c. To hold a suspension of single cells.

d. To cool the flow chamber.

e. To improve the fluorescence of the cells.

3. What is the predominant feature of the cell that affects the amount of forward scattered light?

a. Shape.

b. Nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio.

c. Size.

d. Number of mitochondria.

e. Optical homogeneity.

4. What is the predominant feature of the cell that affects the amount of side scattered light?

a. Shape.

b. Nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio.

c. Size.

d. Number of mitochondria.

e. Optical homogeneity.

5. When would you use image rather than flow cytometry?

a. To observe the intracellular localisation of an antigen.

b. To measure large numbers of cells.

c. To measure concomitantly two or three antigens on a single cell.

d. To measure many single cells individually.

e. To measure the average value of an entity within a cell.


Answers